Race Equity Header

Kentucky Youth Advocates believes that every Kentucky kid deserves to grow up healthy, safe, and hopeful. That vision is elusive as long as a child’s skin color still shapes their opportunities. Advocates must work together towards racial equity for children of color, and we hope that these resources will be of use in that effort.

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DATA

What gets measured, gets changed. In order to learn more about the current realities for Kentucky kids who are black and brown, and to track progress towards equitable outcomes, advocates need data. Below are a number of resources with child and family well-being data disaggregated by race and ethnicity.

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Kentucky KIDS COUNT Data Dashboard

Data by race and ethnicity for the state as a whole, featuring indicators in the latest edition of the Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book.

View Data Dashboard

National KIDS COUNT Data Book Indicators

Kentucky Youth Advocates compiled Kentucky data by race and ethnicity for the state as a whole, featuring indicators in the latest edition of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT Data Book.

View Spreadsheet

The Annie E. Casey Foundation KIDS COUNT Data Center

The Annie E. Casey Foundation shares state-level data by race and ethnicity on the KIDS COUNT Data Center. After choosing a data indicator, you can use the toolbars on the left to further filter by year, data type, and more.

View Data Center

County and School District Specific Data

Kentucky Youth Advocates posts some county- and school district-level data by race and ethnicity on the KIDS COUNT Data Center. This data by race can be found in PDFs toward top of page in the “Why This Indicator Matters” section. Note that counties/school districts are only included if there is reliable data for more than one racial group.

Please contact Research Director Amy Swann at aswann@kyyouth.org if you have questions about this data or need other data by race.

POLICY

Blueprint for Kentucky's Children

Kentucky Youth Advocates works with partners across the state to develop an annual policy agenda for kids. The Blueprint for Kentucky’s Children is a coalition of non-profit, public, and private organizations that speaks with a common voice to create brighter futures for Kentucky kids. The Blueprint stands on three pillars: thriving communities launch strong families, strong families launch successful kids, and successful kids launch a prosperous future for Kentucky.

In order for our communities to thrive, our families to be strong, and our kids to be successful, Blueprint for Kentucky’s Children policies must advance racial equity.

The 2021 policy agenda is still in development. Learn more about the Blueprint for Kentucky’s Children and how you can become a partner.

LEARN MORE

PUBLICATIONS

  • Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2019 County Data Book, Kentucky Youth Advocates – The 2019 Family & Community domain (pages 42-43) examines the disproportionate representation of children of color in Kentucky’s foster care system.
  • Children Living in High-Poverty, Low-Opportunity Neighborhoods, Annie E. Casey Foundation (2019) – A KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot outlining how living in areas with concentrated poverty undermines child well-being.
  • Putting a Plug in the Abuse to Prison Pipeline, Kentucky Youth Advocates (2018) – The opening essay of the Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2018 County Data Book (pages 13-17) takes a dive into the impact of trauma, specifically abuse and neglect, on children’s short- and long-term health and well-being and the disproportionate impact on youth of color.
  • Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children, Annie E. Casey Foundation (2017) – A report featuring index scores for children of every race in every state, based on 12 key indicators that serve as stepping stones to opportunity.
  • Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2017 County Data Book, Kentucky Youth Advocates – The four domain sections examine how Kentucky children fare based on race, place, and income for key indicators of child well-being: childhood food insecurity, 8th grade math proficiency, childhood health insurance coverage, and children in foster care.
  • Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2016 County Data Book, Kentucky Youth Advocates – The four domain sections examine how Kentucky children fare based on race, place, and income for key indicators of child well-being: financial stability, 4th grade reading proficiency, birthweight, and parental educational attainment.

PUBLICATIONS

  • Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2019 County Data Book, Kentucky Youth Advocates – The 2019 Family & Community domain (pages 42-43) examines the disproportionate representation of children of color in Kentucky’s foster care system.
  • Children Living in High-Poverty, Low-Opportunity Neighborhoods, Annie E. Casey Foundation (2019) – A KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot outlining how living in areas with concentrated poverty undermines child well-being.
  • Putting a Plug in the Abuse to Prison Pipeline, Kentucky Youth Advocates (2018) – The opening essay of the Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2018 County Data Book (pages 13-17) takes a dive into the impact of trauma, specifically abuse and neglect, on children’s short- and long-term health and well-being and the disproportionate impact on youth of color.
  • Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children, Annie E. Casey Foundation (2017) – A report featuring index scores for children of every race in every state, based on 12 key indicators that serve as stepping stones to opportunity.
  • Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2017 County Data Book, Kentucky Youth Advocates – The four domain sections examine how Kentucky children fare based on race, place, and income for key indicators of child well-being: childhood food insecurity, 8th grade math proficiency, childhood health insurance coverage, and children in foster care.
  • Kentucky KIDS COUNT 2016 County Data Book, Kentucky Youth Advocates – The four domain sections examine how Kentucky children fare based on race, place, and income for key indicators of child well-being: financial stability, 4th grade reading proficiency, birthweight, and parental educational attainment.

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